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art21:

A few highlights from our preview of Ai Weiwei: According to What? at the Brooklyn Museum in New York City, including a few photos of S.A.C.R.E.D. (2013)—which makes its North American debut at this Brooklyn stop—lit only by natural light, before the dioramas were powered on. Ai Weiwei: According to What? opens to the public on April 18.

Watch Art21 videos featuring Ai Weiwei on Art21.org.

IMAGES (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP):

Installation view of Ai Weiwei: According to What? at the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, 2014. TOP: Ai Weiwei, Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn, 1995; BOTTOM: Colored Vases, 2007–10.

Ai Weiwei, S.A.C.R.E.D., detail, powered off, 2013. Installation view at the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, 2014.

Ai Weiwei, S.A.C.R.E.D., detail, powered off, 2013. Installation view at the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, 2014.

Ai Weiwei, Ye Haiyan’s Belongings, detail, 2013. Installation view at the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, 2014.

Ai Weiwei, Straight, 2008–12. Installation view at the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, 2014.

Ai Weiwei, S.A.C.R.E.D., detail, powered off, 2013. Installation view at the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, 2014.

Ai Weiwei, S.A.C.R.E.D., detail, 2013. Installation view at the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, 2014.

Photos by Jonathan Munar for @art21org on Instagram.

(via silentshapes)

silentshapes:

Kintsugi (or kintsukuroi) is a Japanese method for repairing broken ceramics with a special lacquer mixed with gold, silver, or platinum. The philosophy behind the technique is to recognize the history of the object and to visibly incorporate the repair into the new piece instead of disguising it. The process usually results in something more beautiful than the original.

The video above was filmed at Tokyobike in London which recently had a Kintsugi workshop. If you’d like to try the technique yourself, Humade offers gold and silver DIY kintsugi kits. See also: When Mending Becomes an Art. (via Kottke and The Kid Should See This)

monkeyknifefight:

Elisa Strozyk

Wooden. Rugs. Rolls those two words around in your mind hole for a minute or two. German artist Elisa Strozyk has created three variations of these delightful coverings. Strozyk dyes and connects row upon row of triangular pieces as she pulls together the end result of a colored wooden rug, which is so flexible that you can literally crumple it up and toss it into a corner. (via Design Milk)


(Source: -l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s, via silentshapes)